Tule Lake Pilgrimage 2009 Scheduled For July 2-5, 2009

The following is from the Tule Lake Committee.


It has been 67 years since the U.S. government unjustly incarcerated 110,000 men, women and children of Japanese ancestry in ten War Relocation Authority camps, implementing a policy of exclusion and detention mandated by Executive Order 9066.

Tule Lake became the largest and most controversial WRA camp when, in 1943, it was converted into a high-security Segregation Center to imprison 12,000 Japanese Americans deemed “disloyal” to the United States. The allegation of disloyalty was based on two deeply flawed questions—#27 questioned willingness to serve in the U.S. military forces and #28 questioned disavowal of loyalty to the Japanese emperor—that were used to divide persons of Japanese ancestry into categories of “loyal” and “disloyal.” Those who refused to give the mandatory “yes” answers to both questions were classified as disloyal and segregated at Tule Lake.

Despite passage of over 65 years of Redress and a Presidential apology, the Japanese Americans who protested and refused to cooperate with this government demand to prove loyalty remain at the margins of our history, usually ignored or stigmatized as disloyal troublemakers for their dissent.

The 2009 Tule Lake Pilgrimage is dedicated to this spirit of dissent, to recognize the thousands of Japanese Americans who protested and were segregated at Tule Lake Segregation Center. We especially encourage survivors who were segregated in Tule Lake and their families to join us at this pilgrimage. These memories are a valuable part of our history, and we hope you will share your stories of our unsung Japanese American past.

For more information, or to register for the Tule Lake Pilgrimage, click on the image above right.


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7 Responses to Tule Lake Pilgrimage 2009 Scheduled For July 2-5, 2009

  1. TK says:

    When will the next pilgrimage be?

    My grandfather, aunts and uncles were all taken to Tule Lake while my father served in WWII. Not sure about the descent part or why they were in Tule Lake, but I have records, and it appeared to me that they were just taken to Tule Lake because the family lived up north in Yuba.

    Descent againts our government is patriotism, and every American has the right to question what our government is doing when they know what it’s doing is wrong.

  2. Gann Matsuda says:

    Regarding the next Tule Lake Pilgrimage, the Tule Lake Committee’s web site would be the place to find out and/or inquire.

  3. Lily Arasato says:

    I am interested in attending the 2010 pilgrimage. It has been 10 years since I last attended in 2000. To make
    arrangements, I would like to know the dates and place of departure.

    I read about your very sucessful 2009 pilgrimage.

    Aloha, Lily

  4. Gann Matsuda says:

    Lily…thank you for your comment. For more information on the Tule Lake pilgrimage, I suggest contacting the Tule Lake Committee. Here’s their web site (you can click on it): Tule Lake Committee.

  5. Tom Angle says:

    Greetings and salutations. I have a vintage copy of the “Tulerian” christmas 1943 issue, and several letters that were mailed to Grandmother by a woman who was imterned at Tule lake at the time. They offer a window into the life these people were subjected to, and may be of some value to someone. I consider this kind of ephemeris very interesting, but that they are addressed to my own Grandmother makes them even more precious to me. I have often wondered if there are any descendants of the woman that penned these letters, and would’nt it be kind of special for them to know about them… I sometimes feel that these letters might belong in a Japanese American museum, or something… does anyone have any comment, or interest ? Or, is there a forum where this can be shared ? Thank you, have a pleasant everything. Tom Angle

  6. Tom Angle says:

    I dont know why the above blurb says that ” Tom angle says: your comment is awaiting moderation…”.before my comment about my Grandmother’s letters… I did’nt type that in . Perhaps it’s just a step in the format, or something. I don’t know… oh well. Blessings to you all ‘…Tom Angle

  7. Gann Matsuda says:

    Thanks for your comments, Tom. To clarify, all comments submitted are held for approval by the moderator (yours truly) we do this to prevent spam and/or abusive or obscene material from being posted here.

    Regarding the letters your mentioned…if you believe they have educational and/or historical value, I suggest contacting the Manzanar National Historic Site (contact information can be found on their web site). They might be interested. If not, they should be able to direct you to other entity that might.

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