Manzanar Committee Seeks Community Support for Phase II of Youth Education Project

Manzanar Committee Co-Chair Bruce Embrey (left) during the early portion of the discussion on
the Manzanar “Riot,” held in the replica mess hall at Manzanar National Historic Site.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Gann Matsuda/Manzanar Committee

LOS ANGELES — On September 3, the Manzanar Committee announced the launch of Phase II of their pilot project aimed at educating college-age youth about the unjust incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans during World War II, and providing them with tools to help them teach that critical history to others.

The Committee also announced the launch of a crowdfunding campaign to raise the necessary funds for the project.

This project began in 2017 under the working title, Keeping Japanese American Incarceration Stories Alive, a partnership between the Manzanar Committee, National Park Service rangers at Manzanar National Historic Site, and the Nikkei Student Unions at California State University, Long Beach, California Polytechnic University, Pomona, the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, San Diego.

Read more of this post

Tule Lake Committee Files Lawsuit Seeking Injunctive Relief To Stop Transfer Of Tulelake Airport To Modoc Tribe Of Oklahoma

The following is a press release from the Tule Lake Committee.


A view down one of the streets of the Tule Lake
Segregation Center, November 3, 1942.
Photo: Francis Stewart
Photo courtesy Japanese American Relocation Digital Archives
Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

On August 23, the Tule Lake Committee filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California, in Sacramento, seeking a preliminary injunction to stop the city of Tulelake from giving the Tulelake airport to the Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma for the $17,500 cost of Tulelake’s legal fees in the transaction.

The action challenges the decision — giving Tulelake airport lands that occupy 2/3rds of the historic Tule Lake site — by defendant City of Tulelake, through its City Council, to defendant Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma, an entity connected by federal court judgments to repeated criminal frauds and frauds on courts, and an entity in active disregard of state and federal laws.

Read more of this post

Manzanar Committee Mourns the Loss of Friend and Ally, Congressman Ronald Dellums

Congressman Ronald V. Dellums
(click above to view larger image)
Public domain photo

LOS ANGELES — The Manzanar Committee mourns the passing of former member of the United States House of Representatives Ronald V. Dellums (D-Oakland/Berkeley), who passed away on July 30 at his home in Washington, D.C., at the age of 82.

Already a vocal opponent of the Vietnam War, the Oakland, California native quickly established himself as a champion of Constitutional and human rights after his election to Congress in 1970. He remained steadfast in his beliefs in those areas during his 27-year career in the House, perhaps most notably for being at the forefront in the United States in the fight against apartheid in South Africa. Dellums authored legislation in 1986 that would have divested American companies and individuals of assets and holdings in South Africa.

Read more of this post

Honoring The Powerful, Immeasurable Legacy Left By Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (left) with Manzanar Committee member Gann Matsuda at the
annual Day of Remembrance program in
Los Angeles on February 17, 2018.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Alisa Lynch

I’ve been “forced” to recall how I got started as a community activist quite a bit lately.

Indeed, back in June, when NCRR (Nikkei for Civil Rights and Redress; originally the National Coalition for Redress and Reparations) held their event to launch their new book about their incredible, highly impactful history, it reminded me of all the activists who came before me who have been mentors and teachers for my own community activism.

On the morning of July 19, I received word that Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga passed away the night before. She was just a little over a month away from celebrating her 93rd birthday.

Aiko is well-known in the Japanese American, Asian American, and broader civil rights communities for her tireless work for social justice since her time in New York after she was one of the 120,000 Japanese/Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated in American concentration camps and other confinement sites during World War II.

Read more of this post