Personal Approach Helped Stall DWP Solar Project

At an April 1, 2014 press conference, held on the steps of the Inyo County Courthouse in Independence, California, stakeholders called on the Inyo County Board of Supervisors to protect the Owens Valley from large-scale,
industrial renewable energy development. From left: Alan Bacock, Big Pine Paiute Tribe, Mary Roper,
Owens Valley Committee, Bruce Embrey, Manzanar Committee, Meredith Hackleman, Metabolic Studio.
(click to view larger image)
Photo: Judyth Greenburgh

The following was originally published in the June 2, 2015 edition of the Inyo Register. It is reprinted here with permission.


by Jon Klusmire
Special to the Inyo Register

INDEPENDENCE, CA — A personal approach that tapped into a shared history of past battles and victories was credited with delaying for a decade the industrial scale solar power project that kicked off an 18-month public debate in Inyo County about the future of the solar power industry in the county.

An alliance of Inyo County residents and organizations, and the Los Angeles based Manzanar Committee, came together to battle the solar project in 2014, in a move that resembled a similar effort 25 years ago to out-maneuver the Los Angeles Department of Power (LADWP) during the long struggle to establish the Manzanar National Historic Site.

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46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage Photos and Downloadable Printed Program

Banners representing America’s World War II concentration camps are shown here during the 46th Annual
Manzanar Pilgrimage, April 25, 2015, Manzanar National Historic Site.
Photo: Gann Matsuda/Manzanar Committee

In many respects, the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage on April 25, 2015, at the Manzanar National Historic Site, was a resounding success, enjoyed by approximately 1,500 participants.

Whether it was the booming sounds of UCLA Kyodo Taiko, the moving, insightful words of speakers Pat Sakamoto, Hatsuko Mary Higuchi, Julia Teranishi, Manzanar Committee Co-Chair Bruce Embrey, and keynote speaker Dr. Satsuki Ina, the always inspirational words of Rev. Paul Nakamura, or the always powerful, moving interfaith service, this year’s Pilgrimage was memorable for so many reasons.

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Manzanar Committee’s Bruce Embrey At 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage: “Remembering Is Not Passive. We Must Act On Our Memories”

The following are Manzanar Committee Co-Chair Bruce Embrey’s closing remarks at the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, held on April 25, 2015, at the Manzanar National Historic Site.


Manzanar Committee Co-Chair Bruce Embrey, shown here delivering the closing remarks at the conclusion of
the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, April 25, 2015,
Manzanar National Historic Site.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Gann Matsuda/Manzanar Committee

Today, we stand here, at this National Historic Site, on the very land that was once an American concentration camp. We stand here today having had Presidents apologize for this grave injustice. We’ve had Presidents name Fred Korematsu and Gordon Hirabayashi American heroes.

Ours is a powerful story, one we should be proud of telling. It is a story of a resilient people, who, facing one of the greatest failures of American democracy, chose to not only survive, but also to demand justice.

Ours is a powerful story, one of loss of freedom, of racism, and of being marched off to live behind barbed wire, and when forced to leave and resettle with little or no real support, the Japanese American community had mixed emotions. No doubt people were angry. How could you not be angry? Losing homes, businesses, schooling—being accused with absolutely no proof of being the enemy, of plotting to harm your own country, denied your birthright of citizenship, all because of your ancestry. Who wouldn’t be?

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Rev. Paul Nakamura: “A Ministry Bound With The Quest For Justice And Civil Rights For All” – Part 2

The following is the final installment of a two-part series on Reverend Paul Nakamura, who will be the 2015 recipient of the Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award. An abbreviated version of this story appears in the printed program for the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, scheduled for April 25, 2015. Be sure to read the first installment, Rev. Paul Nakamura: A Ministry Bound With The Quest For Justice And Civil Rights For All – Part 1.


Rev. Paul T. Nakamura (left), shown here during the interfaith service at the Manzanar cemetery during the
34th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, April 24, 2004.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Tom Walker/Manzanar Committee

LOS ANGELES — Reverend Takeichi “Paul” Nakamura, 88, pastor of Lutheran Oriental Church in Torrance, California, who has been an integral part of the Manzanar Committee since its earliest years, has blended activism and faith in ways that few religious leaders have done before.

Rev. Paul, as he is known to his parishioners and so many others, will be honored by the Manzanar Committee at the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage on April 25, 2015, as the recipient of the 2015 Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award, named after the late chair of the Manzanar Committee who was also one of the founders of the annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, and was the driving force behind the creation of the Manzanar National Historic Site.

As much as Rev. Paul has done with the Manzanar Committee, his activism and contributions to the community, as noted in the first installment of this series, extends far beyond the boundaries of the Manzanar cemetery, where the interfaith service is held during each Pilgrimage, or the pulpit of his Torrance church.

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