Oral History Of Pastor, Activist, Rev. Paul T. Nakamura Released – VIDEO

Rev. Paul T. Nakamura
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Mark Kirchner/Manzanar Committee

During the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage on April 25, 2015, we honored the Reverend Paul T. Nakamura, pastor of Lutheran Oriental Church in Torrance, California as the recipient of the 2015 Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award.

The award was named after the late chair of the Manzanar Committee who was also one of the founders of the annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, and was the driving force behind the creation of the Manzanar National Historic Site.

Rev. Paul, as he is known to his parishioners and just about everyone else who knows him, is a seminal figure in the Southern California Japanese American community, most notably for his involvement with the Manzanar Committee and the Manzanar Pilgrimage since its earliest days. He was also involved with the struggle for redress and reparations for the survivors of the World War II American concentration camps in which over 110,000 Japanese Americans and their immigrant parents were unjustly incarcerated, also from its earliest days.

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Rev. Paul Nakamura: “A Ministry Bound With The Quest For Justice And Civil Rights For All” – Part 2

The following is the final installment of a two-part series on Reverend Paul Nakamura, who will be the 2015 recipient of the Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award. An abbreviated version of this story appears in the printed program for the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, scheduled for April 25, 2015. Be sure to read the first installment, Rev. Paul Nakamura: A Ministry Bound With The Quest For Justice And Civil Rights For All – Part 1.


Rev. Paul T. Nakamura (left), shown here during the interfaith service at the Manzanar cemetery during the
34th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, April 24, 2004.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Tom Walker/Manzanar Committee

LOS ANGELES — Reverend Takeichi “Paul” Nakamura, 88, pastor of Lutheran Oriental Church in Torrance, California, who has been an integral part of the Manzanar Committee since its earliest years, has blended activism and faith in ways that few religious leaders have done before.

Rev. Paul, as he is known to his parishioners and so many others, will be honored by the Manzanar Committee at the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage on April 25, 2015, as the recipient of the 2015 Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award, named after the late chair of the Manzanar Committee who was also one of the founders of the annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, and was the driving force behind the creation of the Manzanar National Historic Site.

As much as Rev. Paul has done with the Manzanar Committee, his activism and contributions to the community, as noted in the first installment of this series, extends far beyond the boundaries of the Manzanar cemetery, where the interfaith service is held during each Pilgrimage, or the pulpit of his Torrance church.

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Manzanar Commitee Lauds Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga With Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award On July 17, 2011

Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (center), shown here with Manzanar Committee Co-Chairs Kerry Cababa (left) and Bruce Embrey (right), received the Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award on July 17, 2011 in Gardena, California.
Photo: Gann Matsuda

GARDENA, CA — At the 42nd Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage on April 30, 2011, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga, one of the seminal figures in the Japanese American community’s fight for redress and reparations, was announced as the 2011 recipient of the Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award.

The award is named after the late chair of the Manzanar Committee who was one of the founders of the annual Manzanar Pilgrimage and was the driving force behind the creation of the Manzanar National Historic Site.

But Herzig-Yoshinaga, now 87 years old, was unable to attend the event, which is held at the Manzanar National Historic Site, approximately 230 miles northeast of Los Angeles.

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Manzanar Committee Statement On The Passing Of Frank Seishi Emi

Frank Emi
Photo: Gann Matsuda

LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles-based Manzanar Committee extends its deepest sympathies to the family of Frank Seishi Emi, 94, who passed away on December 1, 2010, in West Covina, California. He was among the over 110,000 Japanese Americans who were unjustly imprisoned in American concentration camps during World War II.

Born in Los Angeles on September 23, 1916, Emi was running his family’s thriving produce business just west of Downtown Los Angeles when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942, authorizing the forced relocation and imprisonment of Americans of Japanese ancestry and their immigrant parents on the West Coast. Read more of this post