Los Angeles Day of Remembrance To Feature Community Speakers and Cultural Performances

To download a copy of the 2017 Day of Remembrance flyer, click on the
image above {Adobe Acrobat Reader software required).

LOS ANGELES — The 2017 Los Angeles Day of Remembrance will be held on Saturday, February 18, 2017, from 2:00 to 4:00 PM at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo.

The Day of Remembrance is held annually to commemorate President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942, which resulted in the unjust incarceration of over 110,000 Japanese Americans and their immigrant parents in American concentration camps and other confinement sites during World War II.

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Los Angeles Day of Remembrance 2017: Unite To Uphold Our Civil Rights

To download a copy of the 2017 Day of Remembrance flyer, click on the
image above {Adobe Acrobat Reader software required).

LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles Day of Remembrance 2017, a multimedia, multicultural program supporting civil rights for everyone, will be held on Saturday, February 18, 2017, from 2:00 – 4:00 PM at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo.

The Day of Remembrance is held annually to commemorate President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942, which resulted in the unjust incarceration of over 110,000 Japanese Americans and their immigrant parents in American concentration camps and other confinement sites during World War II.

“The experience of the Japanese American community serves as a stark reminder to our country to protect civil rights for all and stand against bigotry so that what happened to our community will never happen again to anyone, anywhere,” said Richard Katsuda of Nikkei for Civil Rights and Redress (NCRR).

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Rev. Paul Nakamura: “A Ministry Bound With The Quest For Justice And Civil Rights For All” – Part 2

The following is the final installment of a two-part series on Reverend Paul Nakamura, who will be the 2015 recipient of the Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award. An abbreviated version of this story appears in the printed program for the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, scheduled for April 25, 2015. Be sure to read the first installment, Rev. Paul Nakamura: A Ministry Bound With The Quest For Justice And Civil Rights For All – Part 1.


Rev. Paul T. Nakamura (left), shown here during the interfaith service at the Manzanar cemetery during the
34th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, April 24, 2004.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: Tom Walker/Manzanar Committee

LOS ANGELES — Reverend Takeichi “Paul” Nakamura, 88, pastor of Lutheran Oriental Church in Torrance, California, who has been an integral part of the Manzanar Committee since its earliest years, has blended activism and faith in ways that few religious leaders have done before.

Rev. Paul, as he is known to his parishioners and so many others, will be honored by the Manzanar Committee at the 46th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage on April 25, 2015, as the recipient of the 2015 Sue Kunitomi Embrey Legacy Award, named after the late chair of the Manzanar Committee who was also one of the founders of the annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, and was the driving force behind the creation of the Manzanar National Historic Site.

As much as Rev. Paul has done with the Manzanar Committee, his activism and contributions to the community, as noted in the first installment of this series, extends far beyond the boundaries of the Manzanar cemetery, where the interfaith service is held during each Pilgrimage, or the pulpit of his Torrance church.

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Los Angeles Day of Remembrance 2015: E.O. 9066 and the [In]Justice System Today

LOS ANGELES — The 2015 Los Angeles Day of Remembrance (DOR) program will be held on Saturday, February 21, at the Japanese American National Museum (JANM) from 2:00 – 4:00 PM.

The DOR continues to be dedicated to commemorating the impact of E.O. 9066 on the Issei, Nisei and subsequent generations of Japanese Americans. It also seeks to demonstrate how the government’s World War II violations of civil liberties and human rights toward one ethnic group- based solely on race, relates to today’s political and social milieu.

The 2015 program’s theme, E.O. 9066 and the [In]Justice System Today, was inspired by both the traditional commemorative nature of the DOR and the current critical issues of how the United States justice system continues to harm communities of color with unaccountable police violence, profiling and mass incarceration.

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