Call To Action: STOP The Fence At Tule Lake

Over the last year, the Federal Aviation Administration has moved closer to building a fence to protect the airstrip at the site of the Tule Lake Unit of the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument that would destroy the historic character of the site.

The Tule Lake Committee has launched a petition campaign to STOP The Fence At Tule Lake on Change.org and on Facebook.

Barbara Takei of the Tule Lake Committee writes:

The FAA proposes to construct a eight foot high, 16,000 foot long fence to close off the Tule Lake site, to protect the airstrip built on the campsite firebreak road. A “STOP the Fence at Tule Lake” Facebook campaign is being generated by Frank Abe and Lorna Fong; they’ve also started a petition on Change.org to let the chief of the FAA, Michael Huerta, of the opposition to the FAA’s fence proposal.

We need your help. For those of you who use Facebook, please SHARE it with your Facebook friends and urge them to sign the petition at https://www.facebook.com/StopTheFence.

If you don’t use Facebook, please forward the petition on to others in your address book; we want to generate a big response to let the director of the FAA, Michael Huerta, know how important this issue is to Japanese Americans and others who don’t want the history of Japanese Americans to be fenced off and destroyed.

Thanks for your help on this critically important issue.

The following statement by the Manzanar Committee was issued on June 2, 2012 (but not published on our blog until July 6, 2012). It is being re-published to provide background, as well as to reiterate our position on the issue.


A view down one of the streets of the Tule Lake
concentration camp,
November 3, 1942.
Photo: Francis Stewart
Photo courtesy Japanese American Relocation Digital Archives
Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

LOS ANGELES — On June 2, the Los Angeles-based Manzanar Committee announced its opposition to a proposed perimeter fence at the Tulelake Municipal Airport, operated by the County of Modoc.

The proposed fence would enclose the perimeter of the airport, which was part of the Tule Lake Segregation Center during World War II.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) documents, “…the purpose of this fence is to minimize the potential for aircraft-wildlife strikes (primarily deer), and minimize the potential for pedestrians and vehicles to inadvertently encroach on the airport’s runway (pedestrian-vehicle deviations).” Read more of this post

Manzanar Committee Opposes Construction Of Proposed Perimeter Fence At Tule Lake

A view down one of the streets of the Tule Lake
Segregation Center, November 3, 1942.
Photo: Francis Stewart
Photo courtesy Japanese American Relocation Digital Archives
Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

LOS ANGELES — On June 2, the Los Angeles-based Manzanar Committee announced its opposition to a proposed perimeter fence at the Tulelake Municipal Airport, operated by the County of Modoc.

The proposed fence would enclose the perimeter of the airport, which was part of the Tule Lake Segregation Center during World War II.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) documents, “…the purpose of this fence is to minimize the potential for aircraft-wildlife strikes (primarily deer), and minimize the potential for pedestrians and vehicles to inadvertently encroach on the airport’s runway (pedestrian-vehicle deviations).” Read more of this post

A No-No Boy Goes To Washington – Hiroshi Kashiwagi

Playwright Soji Kashiwagi, who is active with the Tule Lake Committee, has even more reason to be proud of father, Hiroshi Kashiwagi, also a playwright and a “No-No Boy,” who was recently invited to an event at the White House, where he got a chance to meet President Obama and the First Lady. He recently wrote about his father’s experience in our nation’s capital.


Photo: Kashiwagi Family Collection

PASADENA, CA — For my father, Nisei playwright, poet and actor Hiroshi Kashiwagi, the journey up the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in the heart of Washington, D.C. was steep and arduous. Now 88 years old, he moves much slower than he used to, but he was determined to reach the top, slowly, step by step, because for my Dad, a steep climb up some steps is nothing in comparison to the long journey he has taken throughout his life to reach this moment.

From a small, country store in Loomis, California, to behind barbed wire at the Tule Lake Segregation Center during World War II, his road to Washington has not been easy. Branded and stigmatized as “disloyal” and a “troublemaker” by members of his own community for his refusal to answer two deeply flawed U.S. Government imposed “loyalty” questions, he has lived a shadowy life of a “No-No Boy,” once considered the “lowest of the low” among those Americans of Japanese ancestry who protested their unjust World War II incarceration in America’s concentration camps. Read more of this post

Tule Lake Pilgrimage 2009 Scheduled For July 2-5, 2009

The following is from the Tule Lake Committee.


It has been 67 years since the U.S. government unjustly incarcerated 110,000 men, women and children of Japanese ancestry in ten War Relocation Authority camps, implementing a policy of exclusion and detention mandated by Executive Order 9066.

Tule Lake became the largest and most controversial WRA camp when, in 1943, it was converted into a high-security Segregation Center to imprison 12,000 Japanese Americans deemed “disloyal” to the United States. The allegation of disloyalty was based on two deeply flawed questions—#27 questioned willingness to serve in the U.S. military forces and #28 questioned disavowal of loyalty to the Japanese emperor—that were used to divide persons of Japanese ancestry into categories of “loyal” and “disloyal.” Those who refused to give the mandatory “yes” answers to both questions were classified as disloyal and segregated at Tule Lake. Read more of this post