Manzanar Committee Decries Efforts To Derail Creation of Memorial at the Actual Former Site of the Tuna Canyon Detention Station

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Overhead view of the Tuna Canyon Detention Station
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: M.H. Scott, Officer In Charge, Tuna Canyon Detention Station.
Courtesy David Scott and the Little Landers Historical Society


LOS ANGELES — On February 28, the Manzanar Committee reiterated its support for efforts by the Tuna Canyon Detention Station Coalition (TCDSC) to build a memorial on the former site of Tuna Canyon Detention Facility in the Verdugo Hills area of Los Angeles and called on the community to not be fooled by deceptive, deceitful efforts made on behalf of the developer who intends to build condominiums on the site.

On June 25, 2013, the City of Los Angeles declared an approximately one-acre size oak grove on the location of the former World War II Tuna Canyon Detention Facility as a Historic-Cultural Monument.

The land that the oak grove is on is slated for a 229-unit residential development by Snowball West Investments, who quickly sued the City of Los Angeles seeking a reversal of the Historic-Cultural Monument declaration, which would allow them to raze the oak grove and build on that land.

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Historic Tuna Canyon Detention Station Coalition Responds To Developer’s Lawsuit Against City, Details Mission, Goals, Vision For Monument

Overhead view of the Tuna Canyon Detention Station
(click above to view larger image)
Photo: M.H. Scott, Officer In Charge, Tuna Canyon Detention Station.
Courtesy David Scott and the Little Landers Historical Society

LOS ANGELES — On June 25, 2013, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to declare an approximately one acre size oak grove on the location of the former World War II Tuna Canyon Detention Facility as a Historic-Cultural Monument (see Los Angeles City Council Supports Motion To Declare Location Of Tuna Canyon Detention Station A Historic-Cultural Monument)

The land that the oak grove is on is slated for residential development, and the developer expressed support of the compromise that specified that the oak grove, not the entire site, would be declared a Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles.

But on August 7, 2013, Snowball West Investment, the developer, did an about face, filing a lawsuit against the City, seeking a reversal of the Historic-Cultural Monument declaration (see Developer Fights Landmark Status For Site of WWII Detention Camp).

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Los Angeles City Council Supports Motion To Declare Location Of Tuna Canyon Detention Station A Historic-Cultural Monument

The following is a press release from the Los Angeles City Council; the Manzanar Committee called on the City Council to Declare the Tuna Canyon site as a Historic-Cultural Monument on June 8, 2013. See our statement, Manzanar Committee Calls On Los Angeles City Council To Designate Site of Tuna Canyon Detention Station As A Historic-Cultural Monument.


Overhead view of the Tuna Canyon Detention Station
Photo: M.H. Scott, Officer In Charge, Tuna Canyon Detention Station
Courtesy David Scott and the Little Landers Historical Society”(click above to view larger image)

LOS ANGELES — On June 25, the Los Angeles City Council unanimously supported an amending motion, introduced by Councilmember Richard Alarcon and seconded by Councilmember Mitch Englander, to declare an approximately one acre size oak grove on the location of the former World War II Tuna Canyon Detention Facility as a Historic-Cultural Monument. This location was used as an internment camp for Japanese, German and Italian Americans during World War II.

“The Tuna Canyon Detention Station is an important piece of our history in the Northeast San Fernando Valley and a reminder of some of our darkest times as a community, nation and world,” said Councilmember Alarcon. “Declaring the Tuna Canyon Detention Station as a Historic-Cultural Monument allows us to protect this important piece of our history, and give us the opportunity to continue to learn from our past mistakes and preserve this lesson for generations to come. I thank the City Council for their support of my motion and the community for their strong activism to support this designation.”

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