Call To Action: STOP The Fence At Tule Lake

Over the last year, the Federal Aviation Administration has moved closer to building a fence to protect the airstrip at the site of the Tule Lake Unit of the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument that would destroy the historic character of the site.

The Tule Lake Committee has launched a petition campaign to STOP The Fence At Tule Lake on Change.org and on Facebook.

Barbara Takei of the Tule Lake Committee writes:

The FAA proposes to construct a eight foot high, 16,000 foot long fence to close off the Tule Lake site, to protect the airstrip built on the campsite firebreak road. A “STOP the Fence at Tule Lake” Facebook campaign is being generated by Frank Abe and Lorna Fong; they’ve also started a petition on Change.org to let the chief of the FAA, Michael Huerta, of the opposition to the FAA’s fence proposal.

We need your help. For those of you who use Facebook, please SHARE it with your Facebook friends and urge them to sign the petition at https://www.facebook.com/StopTheFence.

If you don’t use Facebook, please forward the petition on to others in your address book; we want to generate a big response to let the director of the FAA, Michael Huerta, know how important this issue is to Japanese Americans and others who don’t want the history of Japanese Americans to be fenced off and destroyed.

Thanks for your help on this critically important issue.

The following statement by the Manzanar Committee was issued on June 2, 2012 (but not published on our blog until July 6, 2012). It is being re-published to provide background, as well as to reiterate our position on the issue.


A view down one of the streets of the Tule Lake
concentration camp,
November 3, 1942.
Photo: Francis Stewart
Photo courtesy Japanese American Relocation Digital Archives
Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

LOS ANGELES — On June 2, the Los Angeles-based Manzanar Committee announced its opposition to a proposed perimeter fence at the Tulelake Municipal Airport, operated by the County of Modoc.

The proposed fence would enclose the perimeter of the airport, which was part of the Tule Lake Segregation Center during World War II.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) documents, “…the purpose of this fence is to minimize the potential for aircraft-wildlife strikes (primarily deer), and minimize the potential for pedestrians and vehicles to inadvertently encroach on the airport’s runway (pedestrian-vehicle deviations).” Read more of this post

Despite Flaws, Eyes Behind Belligerence By K.P. Kollenborn Is A Solid Addition To Novels On Japanese American Incarceration Experience

Photo courtesy Erin Carter/K.P. Kollenborn

LOS ANGELES — In the world of novels about the Japanese American Incarceration experience during World War II, there are only a handful of books available, including Monica Sone’s Nisei Daughter, John Okada’s No-No Boy, Yoshiko Uchida’s Desert Exile, and the best known of them all, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and her late husband James D. Houston’s Farewell To Manzanar.

But why have there been so few fictional works about the American concentration camps in which over 110,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry were unjustly incarcerated during World War II?

One look at those four novels mentioned provides a huge clue: each was written by someone who was incarcerated behind the barbed wire of one of those concentration camps—Sone and Okada were incarcerated at Minidoka in Idaho, Uchida was behind the barbed wire at Topaz in Utah, and Houston was imprisoned at Manzanar in California’s Owens Valley. Each of them drew upon their memories of camp, good and bad, pleasant and painful.

Read more of this post

Interactive 3D Model Could Revolutionize Real and Virtual Visitor Experience For Manzanar

Editor’s Note: All photographs and video clips below represent the status of the project detailed in the story as of the publication date. They are not intended to represent the final product. As such, they could contain errors, inaccuracies or omissions that will be addressed as work on the project continues. All images and video in this story are © 2012 CyArk. All rights reserved.


A view of the barracks at Manzanar, as it looked in July 1944, in a 3D computerized model.
(click above to view larger image)
Photo courtesy CyArk

LOS ANGELES — The Manzanar National Historic Site’s virtual museum, accessible via their web site, is a treasure trove of information that can be used to learn about Manzanar through the use of text, images, video, slide shows and more.

Those who make the trek to Manzanar, located Read more of this post

Manzanar Committee Opposes Construction Of Proposed Perimeter Fence At Tule Lake

A view down one of the streets of the Tule Lake
Segregation Center, November 3, 1942.
Photo: Francis Stewart
Photo courtesy Japanese American Relocation Digital Archives
Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

LOS ANGELES — On June 2, the Los Angeles-based Manzanar Committee announced its opposition to a proposed perimeter fence at the Tulelake Municipal Airport, operated by the County of Modoc.

The proposed fence would enclose the perimeter of the airport, which was part of the Tule Lake Segregation Center during World War II.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) documents, “…the purpose of this fence is to minimize the potential for aircraft-wildlife strikes (primarily deer), and minimize the potential for pedestrians and vehicles to inadvertently encroach on the airport’s runway (pedestrian-vehicle deviations).” Read more of this post